Online Education (bachelor’s Degree In Telecommunications)

A bachelor’s degree program in telecommunications management provides technical training on telephone and computer system components, as well as integration operations, coupled with non-technical training on project management. You can also find related programs in telecommunications network management, telecommunications technology and telecommunications systems management. Telecommunications management programs are available online and on-campus.

What Will I Learn?

Since modern standards of telecommunications management may involve coordinating various kinds of voice, data and video communications technologies or components, your curriculum would typically consist of varied levels of training on two or more technologies.

For example, training on voice technologies may include coursework on topics, such as wireless communications, switching systems and fiber optics. Coursework on data systems could cover computer programming techniques, database administration and data networking.

You may also train on electrical and electronic systems, as well as LAN and internetworking, network design, computer/telephony integration, broadband systems and network security. Your non-technical training that pertains to project management can focus on speech communications, management science, economics and business plan development.

A bachelor’s degree program in telecommunications explores the broadcasting and communication of data, video and voice through phones, computers and other media technology. Depending on the school and concentration chosen, study may focus on either telecommunications technology or mass media such as TV and film. A bachelor’s degree program can be completed in four years.
Most telecommunications bachelor’s programs do not have specific prerequisites for admission. Some programs may include courses that can be completed online.

Program Coursework

The curriculum in a telecommunications bachelor’s program will depend on whether its focus is in media or technology. Media-oriented programs feature classes in subjects such as television production and scriptwriting. Programs in telecommunications technology may include courses in data networks and data traffic. Both concentrations can offer internship opportunities. Other possible courses include the following:

History of journalism
Group psychology
Information technology
Art criticism
Signals systems

Popular Career Options
Undergraduate education in telecommunications can lead to employment in an array of industries, like entertainment, broadcasting and journalism. Those studying telecommunications media can prepare for jobs such as:

Copy editor
Media buyer
News writer
Research analyst
Newscaster

Computer network and telecommunications technology students can find installation, repair or management jobs in phone, satellite or other broadcasting companies. Graduates who focused on computers can work as network administrators or technicians in corporate information technology departments.

Continuing Education Information

After receiving a telecommunications bachelor’s degree, some individuals choose to get a graduate education in business, law or the media arts. A Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree can lead to an accelerated career in the telecommunications and entertainment industries. A doctorate degree in a field related to telecommunications can create opportunities in academic administration, research and education.

You May Qualify For Financial Aid.

Early History Of Canadian Satellite Tv

Canada is geographically the second largest country in the world, with its population of 30 million scattered throughout a vast northern wilderness. Although the majority of its citizens live within 150 miles of the US/Canada border, many others live in small isolated communities, out of range of the manor Canadian broadcast services. Early on the Canadian government realized the immense contribution that satellite technology could make in uniting its diverse population. In 1969, the Canadian Parliament created the Telesat organization, an all-Canadian company charged with the task of bringing into existence the worlds first domestic telecommunications system using geosynchronous satellites.

Between 1972 and 1975, Canadas Telesat organization make satellite history with the launch of the worlds first domestic telecommunications satellites. ANIK satellites, names after the Canadian Inuit Indian word for little brother, transmitted the first television and broadcast radio programs into previously isolated regions of Canada and Alaska. In 1978, Canada once again made satellite history by launching the worlds first bird capable of operating on 12 as well as 4 GHz frequencies. Experiments conducted through ANIK B demonstrated the practicality of the small dish antenna for direct satellite reception and provided the worlds first first commercial 12-GHz TV service.

In 1982, Telesat deployed ANIK D1, Canadas first 24 transponder satellite. The countrys second 12 GHz satellite, ANIK C3, was also launched from the space shuttle Columbia. In 1983, ANIK became operational; this satellite was temporarily leased to the American0based USCI corporation for Americas first Ku band DBS service.

So what are ANIK C3 satellites? With four primary spot beams and 16 transponders in the 12 GHz band, each of which can carry two video signals, ANIK C series satellites are in a prime position to deliver powerful regional TV signals not only to Canada, but to most of the United States as well. ANIK C3 was used for delivering cable TV services to Canadian cable TV operators; eventually the bird was able to carry some video for the private earth station owner. ANIK C2 was released by USCI to deliver five channels of subscription television programming into small sized dishes in the Northeastern US. USCI moved onto an American GSTAR satellite late 1984, on the bird was up and running. ANIK C2 then reverted to use by Canadian companies.

Ooma Review Is Voip Really Good Enough

A couple of years ago Ooma VoIP devices came onto the telecommunications scene.

For a quite a while now, the communications industry has been getting us all hyped up on VoIP with companies like Vonage leading the charge in selling the service.

If you’re like me, the monthly cost of communications has gotten to be a significant part of the monthly budget. Any way to save a buck or two is always on my radar, but I wasn’t willing to take the plunge until I knew I could rely on it. Internet, land line phone, mobile phone, TV, streaming entertainment…it’s gotten ridiculous! These “essentials” can end up competing with food expenditures!

he idea is enticing…Voice over Internet Protocol…essentially, using the Internet to transmit phone calls. You already have Internet access; why not just use it for your voice calls?

The “early adopters” explored the early days of VoIP offerings and the reports were not terribly encouraging. Buffering, freezing, weird echo-ing…the technology just wasn’t up to snuff.

Then came Ooma.

In 2009 the Ooma Core VoIP was launched. This was soon followed by the Ooma Hub and Ooma Scout.

What immediately set Ooma apart was the crystal clear voice quality. Ooma set the standard with the leading edge technology and the ease of use.

The latest offering on the market is Ooma Telo Free Home Phone Service.

As technology is apt to do, this new device has become even smaller and sleeker than its predecessors. It’s a simple, unobtrusive device to add to your home.

It’s also incredibly easy to use. Plug your modem into the Ooma Telo and plug your phone into the Ooma Telo. Voila!

The options are great too. Get a new phone number, or keep your old one. Use BlueTooth to connect your mobile to the Ooma. Get rid of your land line altogether or keep it as a backup. Full 911 access even sends your address to emergency services.

You can even upgrade to the Ooma Premier package for more features. You get to try all of them for free and then decide if you want to keep them.